Featuring opinions that matter, by

  • Anastasia Skukhtorova 
  • David Owen
  • Derick Pierson
  • Estee Zakar 
  • Evgeny Greshilov
  • Fawnia Dietrich
  • Jamilla Deville 
  • Karol Helms 
  • Marion Crampe
  • Marlo Fisken 
  • Natasha Wang 
  • Steven Retchless
  • Zoraya Judd

Anastasia Skukhtorova
2nd in Pole World Cup 2012/2013
Second runner up Pole art Championship 2011
Second runner up at 1st pole World Cup 2011/2012
International Judge

David Owen
Since David discovered pole in Fall of 2009, he has been training, performing, competing, and teaching incessantly.  He is grateful that life has brought him opportunities to encourage, inform, and motivate others.

Derick Pierson Aeiral and Circus artist. IPC Ultimate Pole Champion 2013 Pole Art 2nd Place Champion 2013 National Aerial Pole Art Champion 2013 3rd Place World Pole Sport Champion 2013

Derick Pierson
Aeiral and Circus artist.
IPC Ultimate Pole Champion 2013
Pole Art 2nd Place Champion 2013
National Aerial Pole Art Champion 2013
3rd Place World Pole Sport Champion 2013

Estee Zakar Estee Zakar is an international Master instructor, judge, performer and pole fitness model. Estee was the first Xpole Model and sponsored athlete in the USA. She is a Bad Kitty, Pole Fit brand director, and also represents Mighty grip & Dew point grip aids. 

Estee Zakar
Estee Zakar is an international Master instructor, judge, performer and pole fitness model. Estee was the first Xpole Model and sponsored athlete in the USA. She is a Bad Kitty, Pole Fit brand director, and also represents Mighty grip & Dew point grip aids. 

Evgeny Greshilov World Pole Champion IPSF 2012. 1-st runner up Pole Art 2012. World Pole Champion WPSF 2011. Pole Dancer. Aerial Gymnast Choreographer. Judge.

Evgeny Greshilov
World Pole Champion IPSF 2012. 1-st runner up Pole Art 2012.
World Pole Champion WPSF 2011. Pole Dancer. Aerial Gymnast Choreographer.
Judge.

Fawnia Dietrich The worlds’ first pole dancing instructor, international judge, producer, writer, owner of Pole Fitness Studio and Pole Expo and recipient of the IPDFA Industry Leader of the Year award. 

Fawnia Dietrich
The worlds’ first pole dancing instructor, international judge, producer, writer, owner of Pole Fitness Studio and Pole Expo and recipient of the IPDFA Industry Leader of the Year award. 

Jamilla Deville Jamilla Deville is a pioneer of the art form and one of the world's best-known pole dancers. Creator of The International Pole Federation, The Art of Pole DVD Collection, recipient of the IPDFA Instructor of the Year award twice running, and international X-Pole Girl, Jamilla is renowned for her strength, athleticism, and grace as a performer. She is now based in Las Vegas, USA, from where she continues her work as a traveling instructor, performer and judge for national and international events.

Jamilla Deville
Jamilla Deville is a pioneer of the art form and one of the world's best-known pole dancers. Creator of The International Pole Federation, The Art of Pole DVD Collection, recipient of the IPDFA Instructor of the Year award twice running, and international X-Pole Girl, Jamilla is renowned for her strength, athleticism, and grace as a performer. She is now based in Las Vegas, USA, from where she continues her work as a traveling instructor, performer and judge for national and international events.

Karol Helms Karol, with her sexy, slinky style is well known in the pole community for creating the Superman Fall among other dramatic drop moves. She holds the national titles of USPDF’s East Coast Champion 2009, USPDF Miss Sexy 2010, and most recently, USPDF’s 2012 Pro Championships 3rd Place.

Karol Helms
Karol, with her sexy, slinky style is well known in the pole community for creating the Superman Fall among other dramatic drop moves. She holds the national titles of USPDF’s East Coast Champion 2009, USPDF Miss Sexy 2010, and most recently, USPDF’s 2012 Pro Championships 3rd Place.

Marion Crampe Pole dance is my lifestyle. Share with people and contribute to develop this art is my main occupation. The dream begins to take shape when we start to believe it really. I danced, dance and will do it always….AVEC PASSION

Marion Crampe
Pole dance is my lifestyle. Share with people and contribute to develop this art is my main occupation. The dream begins to take shape when we start to believe it really. I danced, dance and will do it always….AVEC PASSION

Marlo Fisken Marlo uses her 25 years of dance, fitness, and performance experience to teach at home in NYC at Body & Pole, and abroad. She is an innovator in pole performance and education and has recently launched the elevatED pole instructor training course and her signature fitness and apparel line, Flow Movement. 

Marlo Fisken
Marlo uses her 25 years of dance, fitness, and performance experience to teach at home in NYC at Body & Pole, and abroad. She is an innovator in pole performance and education and has recently launched the elevatED pole instructor training course and her signature fitness and apparel line, Flow Movement. 

Natasha Wang IPC Ultimate Champion 2013 Pole Art Runner-Up 2012 US Pole Dance Champion 2011

Natasha Wang
IPC Ultimate Champion 2013
Pole Art Runner-Up 2012
US Pole Dance Champion 2011

Steven Retchless Steven was the winner of the first ever American Pole Fitness Championships in 2010, a semi-finalist on Americas Got Talent and in 2013 the male Pole Art winner at the International Pole Championships. 

Steven Retchless
Steven was the winner of the first ever American Pole Fitness Championships in 2010, a semi-finalist on Americas Got Talent and in 2013 the male Pole Art winner at the International Pole Championships. 

Zoraya Judd Zoraya Judd is a mother of two. Zoraya is a world renowned performer, competitor, instructor, guest judge and model currently performing with Zen Arts. "Best Entertainer" at World Pole Dance and Fitness Championships in Switzerland 2012 "Pole Art Champion" at International Championships in Japan 2011/2012 "Strongest Pole Dancer" at Aerial Pole Championships in Switzerland 2011 "Athlete of The Year" at American pole Championships in New York. 2010

Zoraya Judd
Zoraya Judd is a mother of two. Zoraya is a world renowned performer, competitor, instructor, guest judge and model currently performing with Zen Arts.

"Best Entertainer" at World Pole Dance and Fitness Championships in Switzerland 2012
"Pole Art Champion" at International Championships in Japan 2011/2012
"Strongest Pole Dancer" at Aerial Pole Championships in Switzerland 2011
"Athlete of The Year" at American pole Championships in New York. 2010

December's Question of the Month: 

How often do you train on the pole regularly verses when preparing for a competition or showcase?

The POLEs Answers:

Usually I train five days per week. Because I think you need to give your body a break, regain power and then go again.

When preparing for a contest or showcase, I may train two times per day. For example I can practice choreography during afternoon with my coach. And then all tricks in the late evening.
- Anastasia Skukhtorova

Teaching not included, I spend about three hours per week doing pole training when not preparing for competition.  When preparing a performance, I spend approximately 8 hours weekly pole dancing, as well as two-to-four hours weekly doing non-pole exercise.
- David C. Owen

I am on pole almost every day though I try to give myself a day off once maybe twice a week depending on my level of fatigue. That doesn't really change when I am training for a competition I just step up how long I train for and try to create the combos I am going to put into the routine. Then I work with Isis Masoud my choreographer and once we have a routine my training consists of just running that over and over. But I am always doing more than just pole during the week I am also training in contortion 4-5 times a week along with flying trapeze or lyra. When I get into competition mode some of those extra activities have to be put on the back burner which is sad but there is only so much time in a day and only so much ones’ body can take.
- Derick Pierson

I try to train 1-2 hours a week on new tricks (if I am lucky) in addition to teaching many hours a day, which in turn always allows me to practice other tricks. I teach conditioning/stretch classes as well which allows me to work out with my students every week. I strongly believe in cross training off the pole and injury prevention exercises, so some of my pole conditioning happens off of the pole in addition to training on the pole.
- Estee Zakar

Normally I'm spending about 2-3 hours per day 5 days per week for my pole practice. 

But in competition period it's completely different, about 5-6 hours per day 6-7 times per week. 
- Evgeny Greshilov

My time spent teaching is when I practice, which is 1 – 3 hours a day, 5 days a week mainly beginner to intermediate pole. I truly wish I devoted more time to practicing. When I’m preparing for a showcase I will make the time to practice an hour a day, two to three days a week. I also train with weights, cardio, and yoga.
- Fawnia Dietrich

Being a touring instructor means that my training schedule is not always as regular as I'd like it to be. When I am at home in Vegas, I try to get to Pole Fitness Studio at least three times a week, and my sessions can range from an hour to three or four hours at a time. I also cross train, so I include other fitness training sessions in my days.  If I'm in training for a performance, I like to train five days out of seven. The maximum I'll train on pole is six days out of seven, because at that intensity, the body needs a day to recover. More than that is just overtraining.
- Jamilla Deville

When training for a competition, I train 5-6 days a week for up to 4hrs per day.  My eating regimen also becomes pretty strict with a routine of smoothies, lots of chicken, eggs, and fish, and tons of veggies and good carbs.  Regularly I train 3-4 days a week for a couple hours a day and sometimes I mix it up and do non-pole related workouts such as weight training, flexibility training, and cross-training on other apparatuses like aerial hoop and FlyGym!  
- Karol Helms

Personally, it will be different if I am preparing a competition verses a showcase performance. First of all, also if the main goal is to express my passion through a piece, I will focus my attention on certain points for a competition piece and maybe different ones or using different ways for a showcase.

Competition practice: A competition piece is requiring specific criteria depending on which one you entering. I usually start the creation and training process 4 to 5 months in advance before to ensure I have time to elaborate and get deeply into every single points (technique, fluidity, musicality, quality of movement, stage presence, and costume...) I normally train 2 hours a day on the pole while really take care of my body with massages, healthy food and rest (not really different that what I am normally doing out of competition period).

Showcase practice: I feel a little more relax regarding the showcase preparation. I train daily on conditioning, new skills, contortion and dance, taking least a day off per week to help with injury prevention. When I have to create a piece, I will first make the choice of combos, dance ... and build my routine around it. Once I have the structure, I run it twice during the month before the event. I do also love sometimes to take more freedom and end up with an "improvisation" ("improvisation" means that I know my music 100% and the combos I want to include in). I’ve found that this improve gives me other possibilities to move and express myself. A saying I am sure of is "Work" always pays, "Belief" gives the last impulse. Keep pole dancing! Avec Passion
- Marion Crampe

When I have a performance approaching I will train on the pole about 4x a week, while still retaining my classes and cross training.

When I don't have a performance I train about twice a week on the pole. I experiment, create, and work on specific goals. I use my non-performance time to really focus on my dance and acrobatic training.
- Marlo Fisken

During IPC training (which lasted only about a month and a half), I trained 5-6 days a week, poling for about 4-6 hours a day. During my training week, I met with my personal trainer Maria Ramsdell twice and my choreographer Kelly Yvonne once. The training week wrapped with a much-needed two days of rest -- a new practice for me, that made a world of difference! 
- Natasha Wang

Dancing and exercise has always been apart of my life as a way to be healthy and happy.  Wether it be taking a ballet class or training with Nerijus and his Train P3 program.  Movement and exercise has always been apart of my daily life.  

A typical week would include: 

  • Take 1 Train P3 workout, 
  • Teach 3-4 classes at Body and Pole, 
  • Take 1 Dance class,
  • Take (if not teach) Level 5 with Marlo Fisken at BP
  • Bonus: Stretch with Isaac Peña at BP

Training for Competition by week:

  • Take 2 Train P3 Workouts (1 group, 1 private)
  • Teach 3-4 Classes at Body and Pole
  • Take 1 Dance class at Broadway Dance Center
  • Take Level 5 (if not Teach) with Marlo Fisken
  • 2-3 rehearsals in the mornings at Body and Pole
  • Bonus: Stretch with Isaac Peña at BP
  • Along with nightly meditation and visualization 

- Steven Retchless

When I get "self time" on the pole and I'm not training for a competition, I usually get 2 hours a week. When I train for competitions I try and get my "self time" at least every day during the week. I still juggle clients so I do get to touch the pole daily. But whether I train for a competition or not, I never miss the gym. 
- Zoraya Judd